Second snow survey to measure California water supply

Published 01-31-2019

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PHILLIPS STATION, Calif. (AP) - Officials will trek into the mountains on Thursday to measure California's snowpack again, seeking to learn whether recent storms have added to the water supply. The survey comes as a new storm arrives in the state, prompting some voluntary evacuations.

The California Department of Water Resources will perform the second survey of the season in the Sierra Nevada.

Farther south, rain fell from southern Sonoma County southward down the Central Coast.

Winter snow provides drinking water for much of the state as it melts in the spring and summer and flows into reservoirs for storage.

The Sierra snowpack was 67 percent of normal in this winter's first manual measurement earlier this month. The amount of snow is measured monthly through the winter at more than 260 locations to help water managers plan for how much they can deliver to customers later in the year.

Precipitation has been up and down as the state continues to recover from a devastating drought that led to tight water restrictions for residents and farmers. Persistent drought has also dried out trees and brush, contributing to severe wildfires.

Former Gov. Jerry Brown declared a formal end to a three-year drought emergency in 2017, but said water conservation efforts must continue.

California typically gets about two-thirds of its annual rainfall between December and March.

By early Thursday, Big Sur had already received three-quarters of an inch (19 millimeters) of rain by early Thursday, according to the National Weather Service.

The cold front has spawned a few thunderstorms on the Central Coast and is expected to move down into Los Angeles County by midday.

The current storm will be followed by a break and then a much stronger storm late Friday

Former Gov. Jerry Brown declared a formal end to a three-year drought emergency in 2017, but said water conservation efforts must continue.

California typically gets about two-thirds of its annual rainfall between December and March.

By early Thursday, Big Sur had already received three-quarters of an inch (19 millimeters) of rain by early Thursday, according to the National Weather Service.

The cold front has spawned a few thunderstorms on the Central Coast and is expected to move down into Los Angeles County by midday.

The current storm will be followed by a break and then a much stronger storm late Friday into Saturday.

Riverside County called for a voluntary evacuation of certain areas near a burn scar in the Santa Ana Mountains and the California Office of Emergency Services positioned emergency equipment and personnel there.

By early Thursday, Big Sur had already received three-quarters of an inch (19 millimeters) of rain by early Thursday, according to the National Weather Service.

The cold front has spawned a few thunderstorms on the Central Coast and is expected to move down into Los Angeles County by midday.

The current storm will be followed by a break and then a much stronger storm late Friday into Saturday.

Riverside County called for a voluntary evacuation of certain areas near a burn scar in the Santa Ana Mountains and the California Office of Emergency Services positioned emergency equipment and personnel there.

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